Other Animals

Researchers have described a new chameleon species from the Bale Mountains of south-central Ethiopia, and say the biodiversity hotspot may harbor even more. Named Wolfgang Böhme’s Ethiopian chameleon (Trioceros wolfgangboehmei), in honor of the senior herpetologist at the Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig (ZMFK) in Bonn, Germany, the chameleon is around 15 centimeters (6 inches)
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A team of ornithologists from the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Paraguay has described a new species of trogon from the Atlantic Forest of north-eastern Brazil. The trogons and their close relatives, quetzals, are members a pantropically distributed order of birds consisting of a single family, the Trogonidae, which contains at least 43 species and
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Nature! You’re something else. Not only are you gifted with a wide array of tools for creation, but you’re also plenty handy with colors and imagination. It doesn’t take too long to glance around us and see just how diverse the world is with its many forms of life. Shapes, functions, kind, various orientations that
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A Snow Goose comes in to land. Photo: Maruthi Naga Vamsi Krishna Prasad Kotti/Audubon Photography Awards ᐯᔭᑕᐠ ᑲᓇᓇᑲᒋᑕᓂᐧᐊᐠ ᑭᒋᑲᒥᐠ ᑕᐣᑌ ᐱᑯ ᐃᔑ ᒥᔑᒧᑯᒪᐣ ᐊᐢᑭᐠ ᓀᐢᑕ ᑲᓇᑕᐢᑭᐠ ᓇᐧᐊᐨ ᐁ ᐊᑎ ᐊᐧᑲᐱᐳᐠ ᓀᐢᑕ ᐧᐃᐸᐨ ᐁᓯᐧᑲᐠ᙮ ᓄᑯᓯᐧᐊᐠ ᓇᓇᑲᐤ ᔑᔑᐸᐠ ᑭᐧᐁᑎᓄᐠ ᐁ ᐃᐢᐸᓂᒋᐠ ᐁ ᐃᑐᑌᒋᐠ ᑲ ᐃᔑ ᐧᐊᐧᐃᒋᐠ ᑲ ᐃᔑ ᐧᐊᒋᐢᑐᓂᒋᐠ᙮ ᐁᓇᓇᑲᐧᐃᓇᑯᓯᒋᐠ ᔑᔑᐸᐠ ᑭᒋᑲᒥᐠ ᑲ ᐃᑕᒋᐠ ᐊᑎᐟ ᑲᒪᒥᔑᑭᑎᒋᐠ᙮ ᓀᐢᑕ
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Whales are beautiful, intelligent, majestic creatures. Sadly, hundreds of thousands of them die as a result of bycatch, shipping accidents, plastic pollution, among other man-made issues every year. In 1986, a moratorium from the International Whaling Commission (IWC) banned commercial whaling; however, Iceland, Norway, and Japan refuse to comply. Whaling involves harpooning a whale that
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Ruby-throated Hummingbirds rapidly double their body weight in fat as they prepare for migration. Photo: Barry Jerald Jr./Audubon Photography Awards It’s tempting to compare bird migration to marathon running. In both, participants prepare intensely and undergo an extreme test of endurance. But the similarities stop there. Though marathon runners push the human body to its
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Evidence from a new study suggests that octopuses experience pain emotionally, in addition, to physically; meaning that these intelligent sea creatures process pain similarly to how mammals do. While many invertebrates demonstrate a reflex response to physical stimuli, the ability to truly experience “pain” involves the emotional components of suffering and distress in addition to
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According to the Mountain West News Bureau, Montana Gov. Greg Gianforte trapped and killed an adult black wolf near Yellowstone National Park on February 15. The wolf, number 1155, was tracked by radio-collar and lives in Yellowstone. He trapped the wolf on a private ranch after it wandered off federal lands. While it is legal
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Western Meadowlark. Photo: James Halsch/Audubon Photography Awards NEW YORK – The National Audubon Society welcomed Erin Giese, data manager at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s Cofrin Center for Biodiversity, and Rod Brown, a founding partner of Cascadia Law Group PLLC, to its national board of directors. The two newest members bring expertise in biodiversity and
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Marshall Johnson, center, and Kay Cornelius meet with Panorama rancher Dave Hutchinson on his Nebraska ranch. Photo: Wyatt DeVries To Audubon’s Marshall Johnson, the relationship between cattle, birds, and even neutralizing ranching’s greenhouse gas output is both logical and obvious. With 84 percent of American grasslands privately owned and 95 percent of all grassland birds
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According to Wildlife SOS, an elephant was killed on a road in India. 40-year-old Lakshmi was killed by a negligent truck driver in Rajasthan. Wildlife SOS heard about the accident and rushed to her aid. A veterinary team went to the elephant with medical equipment. The team concluded that her condition was critical due to
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