Month: April 2020

Blue Jay. Photo: Matthew Heckerling/Audubon Photography Awards With states issuing stay-at-home orders and closing public parks in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, birders aren’t flocking to spring migration season hotspots like they would in any normal year. But social distancing hasn’t stopped people from birding. During this time of stress and worry, backyard birding has brought many a sense of
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female and male green-rumped parrotlets in Venezuela By kulyka/flickr We lovingly name each other with a personal moniker. But what about animals and other living things? We know too well that birthed and hatched creatures are well-attended to by their parents. Do the parents apply names to their young in specific ways just like we
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The COVID-19 pandemic has provided photographers all over the country with the opportunity to view nature through a new lens—one aimed intensively at their own homes. We asked three professional photographers to document the birdlife around them during their stay-at-home orders. Beginning today and over the next few weeks, we will publish their images, as well as a personal
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Turkey Vulture. Photo: John Comisky/Audubon Photography Awards The ability of flight sets birds apart from many other creatures. While insects, bats, and even some gliding squirrels and fish can take flight into the air, none of them can match the speed, agility, and strength of birds. Some birds can fly as fast as 55-65 mph, which is
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Red-tailed Hawk. Photo: Morris Finkelstein/Audubon Photography Awards This activity invites children to use their creative imaginations to celebrate raptors—a.k.a., birds of prey—with poetry. All you need are pencils, paper, and your words. Raptors are a fascinating group of birds for many reasons. They are symbols of strength, power, wisdom, and even ferocity. They are also beautiful
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Baltimore Oriole. Photo: Lorraine Minns/Audubon Photography Awards NEW YORK — This week, Fast Company announced National Audubon Society and Domino Data Lab as finalists in their 2020 ‘World Changing Ideas Awards,’ which elevate products and concepts that make the world better. Audubon’s Survival By Degrees: 389 Bird Species on the Brink climate change report and
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Photos/Illustration clockwise from top left: Devin Grady/Audubon Photography Awards; Bridget Bennett; Alex Tomlinson; Mary Lundeberg/Audubon Photography Awards; Luke Franke/Audubon; Camilla Cerea/Audubon It’s been a rough month and a half for people who love birds and exploring the outdoors, and at times it felt like we were going to miss spring migration altogether. But as everyone
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Ruby-throated Hummingbird with a Jewelweed. Photo: Will Stuart March winds and April showers do not always guarantee May flowers—especially when warming temperatures pose challenges to wildlife and people everywhere. Though urban, suburban, and rural landscapes across the country differ in ecological makeups, planting native grasses, trees, and shrubs in these communities is a comprehensive solution
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Photo: Orjan Ellingvag/Alamy It would have been a controversial move under any circumstances, but an announcement from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency last week looked especially problematic given the context: During an outbreak of a disease that attacks people’s ability to breathe and has killed more than 45,000 Americans, the agency finalized a rule that
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Art from Nature Obscura: A City’s Hidden Natural World, by Kelly Brenner. Illustration: Zoe Keller We’re in need of distraction. In this time of isolation and self-quarantine, movie theaters, museums, bars, and restaurants are closed, and we’re binged-out on TV shows. We can’t do what we’d normally be doing in our spare time—wandering around outside unfettered, searching
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JUNEAU, Alaska― Conservation groups today called on the U.S. Forest Service to take immediate steps to protect Alexander Archipelago wolves on Prince of Wales Island in Alaska’s Tongass National Forest following word that 97 percent of the most recent estimated population was killed this past trapping season. In their letter the groups also urged the
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