Month: December 2019

In today’s technological fields, advancements are being made faster than at any time during the history our species. Advancements in medicine, all forms of communications, and even gene-editing to move away from naturally occurring genetic defects have leap-frog events recorded in months and years rather than generational. These advancements not only benefit the human race,
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According to the United Nations, palm oil is found in approximately half of all products in supermarkets. But palm oil is destroying forests and killing animals. Orangutans, especially, are losing their homes and lives to the production of palm oil. Palm oil is taken from forests that house 10% of the world’s biodiversity and provide
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Atlantic Puffin. Photo: Francine Rattner/Audubon Photography Awards WASHINGTON (Dec. 30, 2019) – The following statement was issued by Dr. Karen Hyun, Vice President for Coastal Conservation at the National Audubon Society, in response to a federal appeals court decision to uphold the designation of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument off the New
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A thriving population of jaguars living on a small, unspoilt island off the coast of the Brazilian Amazon has learned to catch fish in the sea to survive, conservationists have found. The Maracá-Jipioca Ecological Station island reserve, three miles off the northern state of Amapá, acts as a nursery for jaguars, according to WWF researchers
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Wildlife carers in Australia are ready to work around the clock over Christmas, preparing for more admissions particularly for baby animals stressed by hot weather, bushfires and drought. Conditions have cooled over the past few days, after devastating bushfires that have burnt more than 4 million hectares across five states since September. Nine people have
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KABALE DISTRICT, Uganda — Ten years ago, grey crowned cranes (Balearica regulorum) had become a rare sight along the highway connecting the Ugandan capital, Kampala, to Rwanda. Across the birds’ entire range in East and Southern Africa, the cranes’ populations had declined steeply. But efforts to restore their wetland habitats in Uganda are succeeding, and
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There has not been much good news for life on Earth this year, with up to 1m species at risk of annihilation, many within decades. But scientists, conservationists and armies of volunteers are working relentlessly to understand and preserve endangered species. Here are 10 biodiversity stories that provided a glimmer of hope. Fifty years ago,
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The world has long associated plummeting populations of Southeast Asian wildlife with news of forest degradation and poignant images of deforested lands. Recent studies, however, bring to light another human practice that’s been driving the decline of wildlife numbers in these ecosystems. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin,
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